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How to Deal with Problem Employees at Your Small Business

by jcp
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By Peter Wasmer, Founder & CEO of Pure Coastal Technologies Inc.

When it comes to toxic employees, it’s important to take a proactive approach. This means being aware of the signs of a problematic employee and addressing the problem before it becomes too big.

 Some common signs of a toxic employee include:

– Chronic job absenteeism

– Excessive job tardiness

– Poor job performance

– Negative attitude about the job

– Lack of cooperation

– Constantly causing drama on the job

 If you notice any of these signs in an employee, it’s important to address the problem immediately. Talk to the employee about their behavior, express interest and concern, and explain what is expected of them.  A few of the common employee challenges that business owners face relate to issues such as theft, substance abuse, anger issues, and tardiness.

Employee Theft

Employee theft is a serious problem that can have a major impact on your business success. While it’s impossible to completely prevent employee theft, there are some steps you can take to minimize the risk. Some of the most effective ways to prevent employee theft include:

– Conduct background checks on all new hires

– Implement a company-wide employee theft policy

– Have a clear code of conduct

– Monitor employee activity

– Conduct regular company audits

Employee Substance Abuse Challenges

If you suspect that an employee is abusing substances, it’s important to act immediately. Talk to the employee about your concerns and explain the consequences of substance abuse. Some of the most effective ways to prevent substance abuse include:

– Conduct drug tests on all new employees at the company

– Implement a substance abuse policy for employees

– Monitor employees’ activity

– Conduct regular employee audits

Employees with Anger Issues

Anger is a normal emotion, but it can be a serious problem at work. If you have employees who are struggling to keep anger in check, it’s important to act before it gets out of control. By taking a proactive approach, you can minimize the negative impact that angry employees could have on your business. Some of the most effective ways to deal with employees with anger issues include:

– Put an anger management policy in place for employees

– Monitor the employee’s behavior and performance

– Provide counseling or other support for employees

– Take disciplinary action, up to and including termination

Tardy Employees

While it’s impossible to completely prevent someone from being late, there are some steps you could take to minimize the risk. Some of the most effective ways to deal with employees who are always late include:

– Talk to the employee about their behavior

– Implement a tardy policy

– Track the employee’s behavior

– Take disciplinary action, up to and including termination

If problems persist in these and/or other areas, you may need to take disciplinary action, up to and including termination. It’s important to remember that, while a toxic employee can be difficult to deal with, it’s worth trying to fix the problem before you resort to firing them. By taking a proactive approach, you can minimize the negative impact a toxic employee can have on your business. It’s never easy to let someone go. But if you’ve made the decision that it’s time for an employee to go, there are some steps you need to take to ensure the process goes smoothly – both for yourself and for the employee.

The first step is to make sure you have a good reason for firing the employee. If you’re firing the employee for poor performance, make sure you have documented their shortcomings and given them a chance to improve. If you’re firing them for attendance issues, make sure they were aware of the company’s attendance policy and that they violated it. And if you’re firing them for behavioral issues, make sure you have talked to the employee about the problem and given them a chance to correct it. If you can’t justify the firing based on these factors, you may be better off trying to coach the employee or working out a different arrangement, such as a demotion or pay cut.

Once you’ve decided that firing is the best course of action, there are a few things you need to do to make sure the process goes smoothly.

  • First, inform your other employees of the situation. This will help prevent rumors from spreading and help keep morale up.
  • Next, make sure you have all your ducks in a row. This means having a solid legal justification for the firing, as well as any documentation you may need to back up your decision.
  • Finally, be professional and respectful when you fire the employee. Give them a chance to ask questions or say their piece but avoid getting into a heated argument. It’s important to remember that, even though you’re firing them, they are still a human being and deserve to be treated with respect.

By following these steps, you can ensure that firing an employee is done correctly – and that it’s as painless as possible for everyone involved.